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Category Archives: culture


Traditionally White Sorority Zeta Tau Alpha Pulls Shocking Upset. 

The ladies of Zeta Tau Alpha – Epsilon chapter at the University of Arkansas rocked and shocked the crowd during the Sprite 2010 Step-Off  Finals in Atlanta on Feb. 20th. The blogosphere is full of haterade over their shocker win.  Stepping and step competition is a long standing cultural tradition within black Greek organizaitons with roots deep in African American culture.  So it was a shock to the system to see the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha, a traditionally and predominantly white sorority, bring a tight routine to the stage and rock it pretty decent. Now, black folk are mad but wait a minute, its a step COMPETITION. So I’m moved to ask “What? White sorority girls ain’t allowed to win?

The anger at this win is running hot and heavy in many sectors of the net with some alleging that ZTA won based on novelty value, others stating flatly that they were not as good as the 2nd place team (AKA Tau chapter, Hoosier women hailing from right here in Indiana at IU Bloomington). Others have said they won because of Sprite/MTV rating manipulation or simply because the judges were influenced that they got more “house” than the other teams did.  Some folks who were on the scene for the competition say ZTA broke the rules with the rump shaker moves at the end of their routine and should have been penalized.

I’ve watched the routine several times from a variety of You Tube generated vantage points and I’ve watched the other routines.  ZTA was good. They weren’t perfect.  They got a lot of house from the crowd, perhaps a fair bit more than the other teams and that was certainly due in part to the fact that they were white and doing something a white sorority was assumed incapable of.  But for me, the bottomline was that their routine was a whole lot of fundamentals. A lot of step action, very little dancing or playacting and short transitions without long pauses.  They were in motion nearly the entire routine. At the end of the day, ZTA won with a little bit of novelty and a whole lot of heart and hard work.  They brought it as hard as they knew how and it was enough to win.

They took home $100,000. The crowd and now the rest of us, took home a whole lot of angst. Here is the team that the judges awarded second place.  You can judge for yourself. Bear in mind that for both, the angle is not the best.

Around the net, here were common themes and my reaction:

Stepping is Ours, Now White People Want That Too?
I am so sick of our culture getting raped and we can never have anything to have self respect of our culture and pride….Kingsley – Bossip.com

Black folk didn’t lose something because a white sorority chapter learned to step. Their win doesn’t elevate to a rape of black culture just because they won $100k doing something that traditionally has been a cultural domain of black America. On a more objective level, its not true. This is a southern chapter of ZTA based at the University of Arkansas, so for their entire history as a chapter, they have been surrounded by the cultural practice of stepping. Why be surprised that they took it up. This chapter has been stepping for 15 years according to some reports. I would be very surprised to find that stepping is a part of ZTA sorority culture outside their southern chapters. The reality is that stepping remains very much a part of the cultural DNA of black folk. Nobody came and violated us to take stepping away, we freely displayed and spread it, indeed taught it to ZTA at some point. To say now that we are diminished by their emulation of us is simply foolish and misapprehends the value of our cultural capital.

They Won Because of the Novelty Factor
I was there, and while the ZTA’s did do an excellent job, the Tau Chapter AKA’s definitely did better. What put them over the top for the win was shock value which garnered crowd participation. The crowd went wild when they saw they were white. Bailey – The Smoking Section

This basically boils down to the argument that they had an unfair advantage because they had a gimmick: they were white.  Guess what? That’s true.  They were white and that made them interesting out the gate. The fact that they actually knew what they were doing however is what took them to the next level.  The novelty would have meant nothing if they could not actually step. The novelty was an early hook, it got you to pay attention. After that, it was all hard work and showmanship, the best way they knew how. Crowd appeal is a component that affects judges scoring and Zeta Tau Alpha had that. Its called showmanship. The fact that they (ZTA) all looked alike in appearance and body type generally also gave the “illusion” of higher levels of precision and so on.They worked with what they had.

My personal favorite – Conspiracy! It Was Fixed by Sprite for the Ratings
they definitely won for ratings, which obviously worked; its all over the media.  Bailey – The Smoking Section

This last one is so stupid you can only laugh. They got a standing O from a black crowd in a competition filled with black teams and with all black judges. But the fix was in. This line of thinking was apparently being spun by some judges from the competition on Atlanta radio, some stating they gave TAU a perfect score, and questioning what may have happened.

Bottom line: the contest result here upended everybody’s cart of assumed understandings about who can step, who should step and how we interpret this cultural activity when people traditionally not a participant in it get involved.

Update:  Holy mackerel! Sprite announces on their Facebook page that they have discovered a “scoring discrepancy” that can’t be resolved and to preserve the “integrity” of the competition, they are naming AKA TAU chapter as co-winners of the competition.  The ladies of Indiana’s TAU chapter will now also pick up $100,000 as well.  I’m happy for the AKA sorors because they can use the money I’m sure.  It makes Sprite look pretty lame though, caving in to all this pressure and lends credence (in some minds) to the conspiracy theory.  Pooly played Sprite, poorly played.

Takeaways from this debacle:


Black Greeks: Stepping is traditionally, historically, culturally your territory and domain, but don’t let cultural arrogance allow you to take your eye off the ball in a step competition.  As ZTA has now clearly demonstrated, you don’t have to be black to step with some level of proficiency. You are all on notice, you can get hosed by a white, yellow, brown or something in between step team on any given day if you’re not paying attention.  We invented the game, now raise it.


White Greeks: The novelty factor will only provide an edge once and this was it. From here on out, you’re going to have to bring it hard and with authority. Given the controversy surrounding the ZTA win, you may even have to be twice as good as the black greek teams in the field to get the win, because now black greek teams will be checking for you.  ZTA did a good job, but their performance was not error free. Future white greeks entering the arena won’t have the surprise factor ZTA did to help cover their mistakes. We’re all clear now; white greeks can step if they put their mind to it. You want to compete in this cultural tradition owned by the black greek community, respect it by bringing your A game.

Sprite: Raise the level of your game with the Step-Off competition. First, make sure the rules of competition are clear and fair. Some transparency about the rules and the judging criteria would have helped you immensely in this mess. Clean that up.   Second, make sure you have judges that have some background relative to stepping. Celebrity judges are cool, but you need to balance them with other judges who command credibility (like some stepping experts)  to avoid this kind of controversy in the future.

Now,  the reaction to this has been silly, but for those of my brothers and sisters who just really can’t get past a white step team taking the top prize, you can be consoled in the knowledge that the competition passed out over a $1.5 million in scholarship and prize money and the vast bulk of it went to worthy recipients from black greek organizations, with the exception of the $100k to ZTA. If that doesn’t get you there, you can further console yourself with the knowledge that at least one of those ladies appears to have been a very fair sista who led this team in competition and taught them the moves (look for the one who’s dance moves look particularly competent, practiced and natural…).  Feel better now?

Thats my take on this controversy. Whats yours?

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Hat tip Shortform blog:

On race relations:

  • 58% of Americans thought Obama would change race relations before his inauguration
  • 41% of Americans say he’s actually improved race relations in his first full year in office source
  • Where was the freefall? Strangely enough, it was largest among other blacks. While white voters dipped to about 40 percent from 55 percent, blacks were at 75 percent a year ago, free-falling to 51 percent – a 24-point decline.

Little newsflash to my disappointed brothers and sisters; it’s not Obama’s job to solve all your problems in life.  Its not his job to solve “racism” to the extent such a thing is solvable. Anybody that thought his election would magically heal the divisions between black, red, white, brown and yellow was criminally deluded. Perhaps this disappointment that some feel is a good thing that will spur some people out there to solve their own problems, now that they realize Obama won’t. 

Crossposted from A Work In Progress – (Yes Villager, Alaine does post). As always, she takes mindshare.

Plan B?


The morning-after pill — made by Duramed, a subsidiary of Barr Pharmaceuticals — is intended to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. It works by stopping ovulation and decreasing the chances that a fertilized egg will attach to the uterus. When used within 72 hours of unprotected sex, it can lower the risk of pregnancy by almost 90 percent, the maker says.

The casual nature surrounding the Plan B pill is extremely interesting to me. The pill will be available to “women age 17 and older” the FDA announced today. What child do you know classifies as a woman at age 17. I’m not even opening the conversation for true debate – I’m really just reflecting on what I know to be the case. Every memory of being 17 reminds me that 17 year olds are not women – they are children in more mature bodies. When I look around at the family members, church members, neighbors and friends who are 17, they too are not women. Young women in training maybe, but do we want Plan B to be part of their educational process?

For the most part, we’re talking about young people who still rely on their parents for food, clothing and shelter. When, and if they work, they earn what my mother used to affectionately call “play money.” Even when I worked as a young “woman” I wasn’t responsible for my living expenses and upkeep, I was really just offsetting the tremendous expenses I was incurring. When I look at who I dated, the decisions I made and the person I thought I wanted to be – I realize that I have evolved into a much different person. Thank God. Instead of allowing young girls the time, space and ability to evolve into who they aspire to be, we have created a society that believes fast and easy is the answer for everything. And we’re producing a generation of fast. and easy.

Planned Parenthood and every group that supports them may very well consider this a victory, which is a sad commentary on our evolution as a society and a community anyway. The real concern that I have, however, rests with the false premises associated with pseudo abortion as a family planning method. Since when does someone who doesn’t qualify as an adult in any other context become woman enough to obtain medical treatment without parental consent? At 17 I had already graduated from high school, started college and moved into my “higher education experience”. At that time I couldn’t get an antibiotic without using the insurance card that was directly tied to the medical coverage my mother paid for. Allergy medicine required authorization. How in the world do we go from that to Plan B.

I surely wish we’d write more articles about Plan A. I imagine Plan B, Plan C and Plan D could have many alternatives other than the “Oops pill.” Oops I shouldn’t have had unprotected sex, so let me ingest an emergency (cough) contraception (cough) pill (cough), so that I don’t have any of the consequences. If we continue to believe that the only damage done by poor judgment is physical, we are doing a disservice to the young ladies we are bringing up as the next generation. We have authored and labeled alternatives as if we are oblivious to the historical, cultural, societal, personal, emotional and financial implications of the choices being made. I know that someone will write, or think, its a woman’s choice. I dare say, we aren’t talking about women at all. This isn’t a choice in my book – plan B offers more stunted growth in decision making. No wonder we can’t problem solve or plan strategically, from an early age we’re taught that there are no consequences to our choices.

We live in an oversexed society that trains young girls from birth that their value is tied to their sexuality and virtue, or lack thereof. When they are tweens we are preparing them for being teens. The new teen looks like the equivalent of your average 20 something – with less fashion taste, and even less sense. We try to make it better by saying that 17 year olds are women and spouting about their rights. With rights come responsibility, and I don’t see very many children at age 17 being ready for all of those either. What can we expect of the women we are raising, when Plan B is covered in the media like something to celebrate as a culture. Plan A could be Abstinence. or Adoption. or Academics. or Athletics. or Aspirations. or the ability to actually grow up.

A better name for Plan B would be Plan F – we keep failing our girls.

Ms. Prejean acquits herself well here. She is poised, confident and unbowed. She was asked a loaded, hot political question at the Miss USA Pageant. A pageant for crying out loud. She had a choice to give the answer Perez Hilton wanted to hear, to give an answer that would not make people uncomfortable, to give an answer that would be safe, or to give an answer that was in accord with her own beliefs as a Christian. She chose to answer in accordance with her beliefs. She chose not to bow down and genuflect before Perez Hilton or answer in a way to curry favor with him just to win. My friend and fellow blogger at A Diva in Nascar Nation watched the pageant and says Ms. California had it in the bag until Hilton sandbagged her with the controversial question. I’m sure she knew when she gave the answer that it would cost her the crown. She did it anyway. I applaud her.

For Hilton, I have little more than contempt for his behavior. Calling her a b***ch because she has an opinion that he disagrees with, an opinion which he asked her to give. I’d say the majority of commenters to his site actually take issue with his behavior as well. Were I an advocate of gay marriage, I would feel that Hilton’s actions here do nothing but bring discredit on those who advocate for it. His behavior and comments are completely lacking in class or taste. He used his position as judge in a nationally televised event to assert his ideas and pass judgment on the beliefs and politics of the contestant, not the quality of her answer. The second runner up, Miss Arizona, got that far with a totally nonsensical answer. The pageant sponsors, judges and directors should all be ashamed of the way Ms. Prejean was treated for answering honestly the question posed to her, a loaded question from a judge with a political and social agenda which he should not have been permitted to ask in the first instance. If the pageant is now going to require that the contestants meet the criterion that they have no conservative or traditional values, beliefs or opinions, they should just say so up front and save people the effort.

Ms. Prejean’s answer may have cost her the crown, but not her integrity. She wins much more than she lost in the admiration and respect of people across the nation, on both sides of the issue who don’t think she should have been penalized by the pageant for having traditional beliefs and values.

Vanessa William, writing at the Root.com opens a conversation on how Michelle is elevating the profile of black women.

“I won’t apologize for taking note of Michelle Obama’s physical appearance. Plenty has already been said about how she, with her double Ivy degrees, six-figure salaries and two adorable daughters, is crushing the image of the struggling black single mother. She is a real life Clair Huxtable! But the true breakthrough here is that sisters who look like Michelle Obama seldom become cultural icons, aesthetic trendsetters—a proxy for the all-American woman.

And don’t roll your eyes and ask why we have to go there; we haven’t completely gotten over our prejudices about skin tone and hair texture. Despite years of scholarly, literary and popular debate—from Dr. Kenneth Clark’s baby-doll tests, to Toni Morrison’s tragic characters in The Bluest Eye, to the showdown between jiggaboos and wannabes in Spike Lee’s School Daze—too many of us continue to accept a standard of beauty that does not favor ebony-hued skin, woolly hair and full lips (and not those surgically enhanced smackers, either).”

She continues:

But consider the complexions of most of the black women who smile or stare seductively at the world from the covers of celebrity and beauty magazines—cream, café au lait, golden honey. Gorgeous sisters, yes, but we come in other good flavors, too. The failure to showcase dark-skinned beauties feeds the notion that pretty black girls are an exception. Not so much dark and lovely as dark but lovely.

APS’s Response: I am pleased to see a black First Family of the United States. It is heartwarming to observe the obvious love and affection between the President and the First Lady. I enjoy seeing a black “everywoman” be honored at home and abroad as the First Lady.
I enjoy the way the First Lady handles her responsibility and role. I take immense pleasure in the fact that my nine year old daughter is highly attuned to the words, actions and travels of the First Lady and that she considers her a model to emulate on a variety of levels – mother, wife, Harvard educated professional and intelligent woman, well spoken, well dressed, clearly home trained, in married partnership with a man who loves, respects and affirms her.

At the same time, it is somewhat ironic, sad and bittersweet that for so many black men and women (but particularly women) of various complexions, that Michelle’s elevation as the First Lady is affirming because she is a dark skinned woman and we perceive her as more “representative” of “blackness” and black women than if she were a fairer skinned woman. I have this reaction to Michelle Obama myself. My wife is fair and she takes great pride in Michelle in part because she is a dark skinned black woman. That reaction is one of the psycho social legacies of America’s past on race, a kind of emotional and psychological detritus that has not been completely flushed from our emotional system.

This curious in its own way reaction perhaps speaks to the resentment that fair skinned black men and women feel towards a culture that rewards a fair skinned appearance and is more negative towards a dark skin appearance. My wife is also the daughter of a dark skinned black woman who experienced prejudice intra racially as well as across races , so there is an affirmation there because Michelle is a mirror to that experience.

So Michelle’s role as the First Lady provokes many positive emotions of pride and joy and admiration among blacks. But those emotions are partly wrapped up and intertwined with our own complicated relationship to our racial identities. Michelle’s tenure as the First Lady will continue to affirm us on the one hand and confront us with this complex inner dialogue about ourselves.

I have no idea what its doing to white folks, though I suspect it might be something equally complex.

Make room for His love and a fire gon blaze

– Matisyahu

The fam and I were out at a local mall the day before Christmas Eve. This was one of the local malls on the West side that has fallen on hard times and whose demographic is decidedly low wage working class. One of the stores in the mall was one of those places that sells airbrushed t-shirts and stuff. Out in front of the store on display were three t-shirts, to show off their wares. One shirt was Lil Wayne, one of Snoop Dog and one of Obama.

Before the rise of Obama, that display would have been all rap, pop culture icons. Now, across the country perhaps, such displays will have the balance I saw the other day. On the one hand, rappers and pop icons but now also, the President of the United States.

I’m okay with that.

What signs and portents of the Obama effect on the culture are you seeing?

Hat Tip: Booker Rising

Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s op-ed piece in the New York Times highlights recent incidents in the Islamic world that underscore the deep divide between Islamic values, as applied in Islamic countries, and western values.

Her op-ed piece focuses on two recent high profile cases: the British teacher who allowed her students to name a teddy bear Muhammad and the Saudi government’s imprisonment and intended caning of a rape victim. These two cases highlight what I think is a tremendous cultural divide between muslims and westerners who are predominantly Christian. People often refute critiques of Islam by saying that what we observe in these instances is not really what Islam is about. I beg to differ. These responses are what we see in in the heart of Islamic countries where the faith is practiced by the majority of people. So I just don’t buy the argument that this isn’t how the faith is expected to be practiced by its adherents. Ayaan Hirsi Ali in her op-ed piece asks the question, “where are the moderates?”. I wonder if they exist at all.

Because here is the thing. When we hear about incidents like the muslim woman gang raped and then thrown in jail, I keep waiting for outrage to break out across the muslim community in response. I never see it. Maybe I’m not tapped into the right news, blog or web sources, that could be. I never see an outcry or a sense of horror at these incidents from the muslim community. Seeing no response, I’m left with the impression that this is considered a reasonable outcome, an expected, even desired outcome. The Kingdom practices the active suppression of its female citizens. And the Islamic faith writ large seems to agree. How could we think otherwise, when Saudi Arabia is the site of the holiest places in the Islamic world? Every year, millions make pilgrimage to Mecca. This is the place where muslims go to renew their faith, yea to fulfill one of the very tenets of their faith. Why should I not draw the inference from that that the muslim world considers this response to be completely in line with their faith? By the way, its interesting to note that the woman and the man she was found with were both raped and were both imprisoned and sentenced to caning. There is a divide here. I don’t think its one that can be crossed.

Hat Tip: Booker Rising

Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s op-ed piece in the New York Times highlights recent incidents in the Islamic world that underscore the deep divide between Islamic values, as applied in Islamic countries, and western values.

Her op-ed piece focuses on two recent high profile cases: the British teacher who allowed her students to name a teddy bear Muhammad and the Saudi government’s imprisonment and intended caning of a rape victim. These two cases highlight what I think is a tremendous cultural divide between muslims and westerners who are predominantly Christian. People often refute critiques of Islam by saying that what we observe in these instances is not really what Islam is about. I beg to differ. These responses are what we see in in the heart of Islamic countries where the faith is practiced by the majority of people. So I just don’t buy the argument that this isn’t how the faith is expected to be practiced by its adherents. Ayaan Hirsi Ali in her op-ed piece asks the question, “where are the moderates?”. I wonder if they exist at all.

Because here is the thing. When we hear about incidents like the muslim woman gang raped and then thrown in jail, I keep waiting for outrage to break out across the muslim community in response. I never see it. Maybe I’m not tapped into the right news, blog or web sources, that could be. I never see an outcry or a sense of horror at these incidents from the muslim community. Seeing no response, I’m left with the impression that this is considered a reasonable outcome, an expected, even desired outcome. The Kingdom practices the active suppression of its female citizens. And the Islamic faith writ large seems to agree. How could we think otherwise, when Saudi Arabia is the site of the holiest places in the Islamic world? Every year, millions make pilgrimage to Mecca. This is the place where muslims go to renew their faith, yea to fulfill one of the very tenets of their faith. Why should I not draw the inference from that that the muslim world considers this response to be completely in line with their faith? By the way, its interesting to note that the woman and the man she was found with were both raped and were both imprisoned and sentenced to caning. There is a divide here. I don’t think its one that can be crossed.

Dog the Bounty Hunter really stepped into the poo pile on this one. In a taped phone tirade during a conversation with his son, Dog tells him in no uncertain terms that he has to break off his relationship with a black woman he’s been dating because they use the word “Nigger” and its too big a risk to their livelihoods to chance being caught doing so. To make it even more odd, he also tells him that other people would not understand their meaning when they say nigger, that its not meant to be pejorative, but they mean it some…….other kind of way…I guess.

And so began another of these increasingly prosaic and silly mini dramas of a white person caught out engaging in racially inappropriate behavior and going into full blown redemption seeking behavior (kind of like drug seeking). Its a pathetic spectacle to watch Dog do it and I think I’m equally disgusted with how gleefully willing the culture is to humor this nonsense, indeed to facilitate it.

He runs, crying, to Jim Storey, to Rev. Al, hangs out with Roy Innis and anyone else who is looking for an opportunity to be part of one of these sad little plays. As though they have any real consequence or meaning anyway. My take:

On Dog: Is he a racist? We all have our prejudices. I think most black people assume that most white people have a level of prejudice when it comes to black people, and that it would come as no surprise to them to hear the average white person they actually know express some viewpoint they would not otherwise say in mixed company because it would be considered a prejudiced sort of statement (indeed there are plenty of people who just go there and call you a racist). Sounds like Dog and his family have been calling black people niggers for a long time, since by his own statements to his son, its a commonplace thing to hear around his household. At the same time, I’m sure he has black friends, his minister is black (wonder how much the guy actually attends/participates in church life) and blah, blah, blah. He claims he says nigger around his black friends and that its always been cool. So is he a racist? Yeah, I guess so. Not the rabid lynch’em, castrate’em, kill’em kind, but that sort of everyday, practical I live my life smiling and talking in black people’s faces but inside and in private I don’t really respect them type. To me, the tape reveals that about him and that generally he is sort of a low class, undercultured sort of caveman. No self respecting black person I know will sit around sharing the word nigger with a white person and in my opinion no decent white person or one with any cultural sense gets comfortable with using the word nigger in casual conversation, whether the black people around them seem to accept it or not. And Dog has been that kind of private disrespecter of black people for so long, that he can casually use that word (which I guarantee that he rarely if ever uses to describe anyone but a black person) and think that it doesn’t really mean anything or say anything about him, that he’s not really prejudiced. Its an interesting form of denial, because at the same time, he is totally cognizant of the fact that if other people knew or heard this conduct, that it could mean the loss of his show, impact his finances and the whole deal. So he does know that there is something wrong with it, but figures he’s okay as long as he is a private low life type. Interesting.

On the Son: Dog seems to be a bit of a low life, and I think like father like son. Tucker the son had been sent to prison at the age of 18 and served four years of a 20 year sentence for armed robbery before being released on parole. So he has questionable character out the box. He’s a grown man, he’s got a girlfriend and his Dad, out of concern that she is a bad influence and might lead him to violate his parole, advises him to dump her. So what does Tucker do? He tapes his Dad making all these funky remarks and then SELLS the tape to the Enquirer. All because his Dad doesn’t like his girlfriend. He’s over 18, he’s grown and I don’t think his Dad is taking care of him, so he could do what he damn well pleases. He could ignore his Dad, just stop talking to him or any number of things. But what does he do? Effectively destroys his Dads show and wacks his livelihood by SELLING the tape to screw his Dad over. Definitely a low life. You don’t sell out your blood like that. Not over a girlfriend, over some chick you aren’t married to, aren’t engaged to, have no real commitment to and I’ll be SHOCKED if in a year, he and this girl are still together. For her, he threw his Dad under the bus just because the guy is the private little racist he’s always been. So he’s a low life.

On the Girl: Dog was concerned about the girl and her character, what kind of woman she was and maybe he was right. Cuz, I don’t believe for a minute that Tucker got the brilliant idea to sell his Dad out to the Enquirer like that on his own. He had inspiration and guidance and I think she was it. A theory only further solidified by the fact that she is now pursuing a lawsuit against the Dog for slandering her. This is the same sort of wack, silliness as the lawsuit by the brothers in the club after Kramer’s racial meltdown, claiming they were “made afraid and emotionally damaged”. Whatever. So since she is offended, she advises and supports her boyfriend to sell his father and other family down the river. She had every right to be offended, but what they have done was a low class sort of way to handle it.

On Dog’s Redemption Tour: This is what really disgusts me about these episodes. It is a pathetic spectacle to watch this guy run around trying to find the magical media forgiveness formula to save his TV show and his self respect from any black person that will hold out to him the hope of absolution. I find it despicable that Roy Innis should rush to his defense, or that Sharpton entertain a conversation with him as though either of them have the power to convey absolution for all black people. All of this attention paid as though this pathetic family dysfunction meltdown was even important enough to have such a conversation. As though it is significant enough for such self appointed race champions to get involved with in the first instance. The shallowness of it all is evident in Sharpton’s lack of interest in it. Clearly his calculation is that Dog is not a high profile enough racial offender to saddle up on and ride into the media spotlight. Dog runs around from program to media outlet, making his pleas for forgiveness and confessing the shame and regret of the caught (its not sincere, he was never this reflective in all the years he was casually saying nigger this and nigger that) crying and begging, and the culture happily piles on to watch him embarrass himself with this insipid groveling. It demeans him and it demeans the people who give it an audience and a forum.